Real Estate Dictionary



KAME
A small mound or hill composed of stratified glacial deposits.
KEENE'S CEMENT
An unusually tough and durable gypsum plaster to which alum has been added. Used primarily for walls of commercial buildings.
KEEPER
A term seldom used in the United States. A custodian of a building or grounds.
KELP-SHORE
The shore between the high and low water marks.
KEOGH PLAN
A retirement plan whereby a self-employed person may set aside a certain portion of income (tax deferred) into a retirement account. The money is taxable upon withdrawal at retirement when the person's tax bracket is often lower.
KERF
(1) A notch or slit made by a saw. (2) The width of the cut of a saw blade.
KEY LOT
(1) A strategically located lot, adding to its value. (2) A lot adjoining a corner lot at its rear property line with frontage on the secondary street. Also called a Butt Lot.
KEY TENANT
See: Prime Tenant.
KEYMAN INSURANCE
Insurance through loss (through death or disability) of a "key" (important) person in a company. The liability is the estimated cost of the loss (in business lost, and replacement of the individual). Some lenders require this insurance before lending to small companies which rely on one or a few "key" people.
KEYSTONE
The piece, usually wedge shaped, at the top of an arch.
KICK PLATE
A metal or plastic strip, placed at the lower edge of a door or on a riser of a step to protect it from damage by accidental kicking.
KICKBACK
A term generally used to describe an illegal rebate. See: Rebate.
KICKER
See: Participation.
KILN
(1) An oven which reaches high temperatures for baking ceramics or bricks. (2) A room or shed through which warm, dry air is circulated to dry lumber.
KILO
One thousand; a prefix (kilometer - 1000 meters; kilogram - 1000 grams).
KILOGRAM
1000 grams (2.204 pounds).
KILOMETER
1000 meters. See also: Meter (1).
KILOVOLT
1000 volts.
KILOWATT
1000 watts.
KILOWATT HOURS
1000 watt-hours.
KIN
Those related by blood.
KIOSK
An open pavilion such as a bandstand or newsstand. Used to describe the structures in the open areas of malls that sell specialty items.
KIP
1000 pounds. Formed by combining the words kilo and pound.
KITE WINDER
The steps at the curvature of a circular stairway, which are triangular, or kite-shaped.
KNOCK DOWN
Any parts of a building which can be easily assembled, installed, or removed, such as certain types of window frames, partitions, etc.
KNOLL
A small rounded hill.
KNOT
(1) The hard, irregular shaped defects in boards, caused by cutting at the point where the branch of the tree meets the trunk. (2) A measure of speed, equal to one nautical mile (approximately 6,076 ft.) per hour.